The Country Cooking of Greece


Creating “buzz” for an upcoming book is a campaign that starts months in advance of publication to build an audience for the book by providing fresh content! CMTv helps authors build an audience for their books using an integrated campaign that includes blogs, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

The Campaign

The Country Cooking of Greece a book by author Diane Kochilas and photographer Vassilis Stenos will be released in October 2012. To build anticipation for the book’s publication, CMTv started its campaign in January 2012. The campaign highlights how materials can be repurposed for use on different platforms as it is based on a set of photographs.

  • Every two weeks we release new photo album on www.Facebook.com/GreekFoodTv
  • CMTv takes each album and animates it to video, with author Diane Kochilas narrating over an original soundtrack. This video is posted on www.YouTube.com/GreekFoodTv and distributed using RSS feeds to Facebook, Twitter and blogs.
  • Diane also posts on Facebook, Twitter and her blogs about the creation, production and publish process of the book.
  • www.YouTube.com/GreekFoodTv has more than 2500 subscribers and nearly 600,000 views

Conclusions

This campaign keeps the upcoming book fresh in the minds of potential readers and helps build her an interactive community with whom she can discuss areas of interest.

 

Materials from up coming book

One of the first chapters in the Country Cooking of Greece is a small one called the Greek Touch: Rusks. Rusks, or paximadia, as they are called in Greek, are one of the ancient foods that still define Greek cooking today. This ultimate peasant treat, a twice-baked hard tack that can break your teeth (!) if it isn’t rehydrated, came to life again int he modern Greek kitchen as chefs rediscovered its nutty flavor and its versatility. The variety of rusks in Greece is huge, from large wedge-shaped pieces to round donut-shaped pieces, to mini chunks; some are flavored with spices and herbs; they can be made with wheat, rye, barley, and even chick pea flour. In CC of Greece, you’ll read all about them.

March comes in like a lion and usually goes out like a lamb, as they say. It’s also the most austere fasting month. But regardless of the weather and despite the spirit of abstention, the foods are vibrant and robust and the landscape often colorful, even if the sun isn’t shining.

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